Alaska 2014 Part 3: A slog on North America’s highest peak

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The wind is blowing fresh snow in our faces. Layers of ice start to stick on my cheeks and slowly, I begin to lose all feeling in my nose. These are the moments when you really start to wonder what you’re doing up in the central Alaska Range.

140521_ALAS_IMG_1830_LoRes

The rime plastered tent sealing

On the 17th of May we left the Kahiltna airstrip late in the morning. Maxime and I started walking on the low angled Kahiltna Glacier. Within a few hours, we arrived at Ski Hill Camp just in front of the first steeper step. We ate a quick lunch in companion of another Belgian climbing party who, before heading on a 6 months cycle journey, wanted to climb Denali’s West Buttress. While they pitched their tent we moved on. We wanted to make as much progress as possible and came up with the not-so-promising plan to get directly to the 11.000ft camp Now, in the afternoon, it’s a complete whiteout. We don’t know where we are exactly. We just follow the trail that is followed by the thousands of West Buttress Denali climbers. As fresh snow slowly fills the old traces, we just look out for the small bamboo sticks planted into the glacier by previous visitors. We spend a lot of energy pulling our heavy sledges. During the years, I managed to slim my pack down to the lightest and most essential gear, but somehow, thanks to my ever-growing photographical kit, the sledge is once again way too heavy. From time to time we take a small pause. I turn around and Maxime is only slightly visible, as a silhouette disappearing into the mist. I take a deep breath before we continue, wondering why I came back to this place.

Sam searching for the 11.000ft camp

Sam searching for the 11.000ft camp

I’ve been in Alaska before. In May 2010, I teamed up with Joris Van Reeth. We knew each other from Mount Coach, a program founded by KBF, the Belgian Mountaineering Club. Just like the Mountain Academy and Alpine Mentors, Mount Coach trains young climbers to all round alpinists. For me the biggest change in, and influence on my life. Together, we experienced 3 busy years in the Alps, one expedition to Khan Tengri and were ready for what felt like our next step. A technical line on a 6000 meter peak like Denali! In 4 days Joris and I brought all our gear up to the 14.000ft camp from where we did some acclimatization climbs on Denali. Finally we were ready and descended the wickwire ramp to the South side of the mountain. We spent one last night at the base and on the 7th of June 2010, we started climbing up the Japanese Couloir. Simulclimbing the gully we arrived on the first steep wall. Joris climbed over it, ran out his rope and made a belay to switch leads. Without me hanging on the rope, the belay ripped out and Joris landed 60 meters lower headfirst into the rocks. He died immediately. By coincidence, a Japanese climbing party appeared underneath the desolated South face. They climbed up and helped me to bring Joris down. They lost motivation for their own attempt on the Cassin and went back to the airstrip. They asked me if I would join them and walk safely down the crevassed North East Fork. But I didn’t feel comfortable leaving Joris behind. Besides, I was in contact with the Denali Park rangers and they tried to get a helicopter into the range to pick us up. Bad weather came in faster than expected and I had to wait 4 days before the helicopter managed to fly me out. They took a big risk by rescuing me and decided to come back for Joris when the weather cleared. Due to a big fresh layer of snow, we unfortunately never managed to find Joris. He is still resting over there and today there is simply no chance someone will ever find him…

  To keep the story short, I will walk over the fact how it feels to lose a close friend in a climbing accident. Although I experienced loss before, I never stood so close to an accident. Nevertheless I think I can say I hit my biggest low ever and slowly had to find my way back up. The fact that I had 4 lonely days to clear my head before I had my first decent contact is something I would never recommend but was helpful in a way. Later, I wrote some small things, trying to explain my feelings, my thoughts and the way I (re)act. As I like to be completely aware about those inner thoughts and feelings. I still remember me sitting in the helicopter. The late evening sun was enlightening the highest peaks. Although I was absent and I didn’t know what to say to the rangers neither the pilot, there was a inner peace. Now that I was in a safe position, I just wanted to wander around in these mountains. That moment, I already realized backing off on climbing was no option. Soon, from meeting climbing partners, I started rock climbing and got back into skiing, alpinism, expedition climbing and so on. In the summer of 2009, less than a year before the accident with Joris, I lost good friends on the Peruvian mountain Tocllaraju. It was only after my visit to the Cordillera Blanca in 2012, I felt some kind of relief for the first time. More than ever I wanted to go back to Alaska too. Besides I realised that coming back to that place brings me some peace in mind. There is an ever growing curiosity about what and how intense I will feel if I am at the massive South face, the north east fork where Joris is resting, the 14.000 ft. camp where he spent his last 3 weeks or the Cassin ridge itself. It’s like every year around the month of May, my thoughts get drifted to that place.

A look into the Noth East Fork

A look into the Noth East Fork, The Kahiltna peaks and Mt Hunter in the background

Now, 4 years later, I’m finally back at the Kahiltna Basecamp. While our experience grew during the years, our dreams and objectives changed. Needless to say, the Cassin always sticks to my mind. But it slowly changed from a physical test piece into a mental challenge and confrontation. Although I wanted to come back somehow it didn’t feel exciting to come back for only a try on the Cassin Ridge. That’s why Maxime De Groote and I opted to climb the Moonflower Buttress instead. The Cassin Ridge became a back-up plan, in case we had some spare time. After spending only 2 weeks in the range, we managed to climb our hardest route ever: a 4 day round trip on the “not so in condition” Moonflower Buttress. Back in Base-camp we take some days of recovery rest. Maxime suffers from a severe toothache and even the maximum amount of painkillers can’t help anymore. He needs to fly back to Talkeetna to see a dentist.

140507_ALAS_IMG_0549_LoRes

A busy day at KIA (Kahiltna International Airport )

Later that evening I walk into Lisa’s tent to get an update about Maxime and the upcoming weather. Lisa is the one who is running Basecamp. Arranging the flights in and out, helping climbers on their trip, broadcasting weather reports and so on. As she has been doing this for several years, she still remembers the accident of Joris and the young guy who was waiting below the mountain. Gently she asks if it was me back then. We start talking about the accident. “So, then you met the Japanese team?” she asks. Wondering what she means, she points to two tiny down suited men standing before a small tent, melting snow for their tea. It turns out that it is in fact the same climbing party that helped me lower Joris down back then. After 4 years they decided to reattempt the Cassin ridge. As I never managed to get in contact with them I am more than happy to finally talk with them. It turns out I even visited their small hometown in Japan two years ago on a skiing trip.

Neko Yanagiyama

The Japanese party, Nagahara Takatomo and Nagahara Rieko

2 days after he flew off, Maxime arrives back into the range. As he knows he can always please me with food, he brought a liter of cold coke and a pizza. It takes roughly half an hour to fly over to the Kahiltna airstrip so the pizza is cold too. But I’m more than happy to exchange a cold pizza for all the sweets and freezed food we had since we arrived. We take the rest of the day to rearrange our bags. The next morning we are on our way to the 11.000ft camp on the Kahiltna Glacier.

Pizza

Pizza

By now, late in the afternoon, fresh snow cleared all the traces, we can’t find the 11.000ft camp and the whiteout makes it impossible to navigate to the exact location. We get tired, loose the motivation to walk on and decide to pitch our tent just next to the path on the glacier. As we zip open our tent in the morning, we finally get a view on the environment. 11.000ft is only 2 hours ahead of us.

Cold and snowy conditions

Cold and snowy conditions

Our stop 2 hours from 11ft.

Our stop 2 hours from 11ft.

Arriving at the 11.000 ft. camp, the wind picks up again and starts to blow clouds into the valley. The weather update in the evening doesn’t sound promising. It’s clear that we have to stay for at least another day in this camp and on the downside there is not even a small 2 day good weather window looming at the end of the forecast. Another hauling day finally brings us up to the crowdy 14.000th camp. Since we topped out on Mt Hunter a week ago we thought to be better acclimatized but nevertheless we are glad that we’re finally done pulling those sledges.

Goal Zero, charging battery's while hauling our equipment to 14.000ft

Our Goal Zero, charging battery’s while hauling our equipment up the Motorcycle Hill to 14.000ft

Finally at 14.000ft

Finally at 14.000ft

As we knew in advance, from here on we have only a week for further acclimatization and climbing the Cassin Ridge. Call us naïve, but we’re just hoping for the right window at the right time. We go for a small talk at the ranger camp and run into Dave Weber and Mark Westman. Both guys have a long history as ranger and climber in the range. As we tell them that we want to go up for some acclimatization, they remind us about some changes in the National Park mountain rules. Climbing on the crowded West Buttress, not only do we need to bring plastic shitbags up to 17k ft, we also need to bring a CMC (clean mountain can). There are no crevasses to throw away poopbags so from this year on, it’s no longer allowed to go to the toilet up there without bringing your poop back down. Not too thrilled to drag this 10-liter bucket on the mountain. We’re only partially joking and suggest to use our reactor stove as CMC. Unfortunately they don’t want to make an exception, so we change our plans and decide to climb the West Rib, as the CMC rules don’t apply on this less crowded route. The cold, one of the downsides about climbing Denali, makes every morning really hard. Especially with all this bad weather and the unpromising outlook. I wake up, staring to the rime plastered tent sealing and I only think about leaving theses mountains as fast as possible. It just seems so useless, pushing forward knowing there is only a slight change to attempt the Cassin. We stay in our tent and wait till the sun shines over the mountain. While the temperature rises so goes my motivation and for the rest of the day time flies. Spending several hours melting snow and cooking till early evening the sun disappears again. 140519_ALAS_IMG_3979_LoRes

The cold base camp live

The cold 14.000ft base camp live

The weather reports don’t give any sign on a perfect weather window but we don’t have the time to wait for it. One day around noon, as soon as the clouds clear, we gear up and walk to the base of the west rib cut off. It is easy climbing but at this altitude we feel our hearts pounding in our chest. Early evening we find ourselves high on the mountain. Beneath us, a thick layer of clouds is coming up. Like small islands only the higher ridges and mountains squeeze themselves through it. We reach a platform around 17.000ft, the so-called balcony camp where we pitch our tent for the night.

On our way to the West Rib Cutt off

On our way to the West Rib Cutt off

140521_ALAS_IMG_1844_LoRes

The higher West Rib

The Balcony camp on the West Rib

The Balcony camp on the West Rib

Maxime feels a slight headache as he gets into our single wall bivy shelter. We brew up some soup to hydrate. While digging into my backpack, searching for our freeze-dried meals, I soon discover I forgot the spoon. This doesn’t seem to bother Maxime as he quickly discovers a candela to use as a spoon. While the sun sets, the colors show the range at its best but the wind is again picking up. The last weather report tells us that the wind will drop the next morning. Hopefully the forecast is right, as we’re eager to move on. Our Supertopo guidebook warns us that this is a bad place to be in a storm. We take everything we can possibly store in our tent and afraid that my shoes will fly off the mountains, I even strap them to the tent. 140521_ALAS_IMG_1850_LoRes

Dinnertime

Dinnertime

While the tent fly smashes into our faces, I can’t fall asleep. Maxime and I don’t say a word but I know he ‘s awake to as he reacts to every movement or sigh I make. When it’s early morning, the wind drops and we finally manage to get some hours of sleep. We wake up, still tired, pack our bags and try to heat up with some warm tea. As it is still cold and just standing won’t help we quickly start to our climb over the easy terrain on the upper west rib. The ridge blocks the sun that is coming up in the east so Maxime suggests moving over to the rib itself. As we reach the ridge, we quickly discover this is no good option either. Despite the heat of the sun we receive the wind in full effect. Within 15 minutes we lose the feeling in our hands and feet. A simple look at each other is all it takes. There is no point in trying to reach the summit.

Time to turn back on our attempt

Time to turn around

We start to climb down in the direction of the Orient Express couloir and follow this snow couloir to the lower glacier and walk back to the 14.000ft camp. As we reach the camp, the sky is clearing and we get that nervous feeling. Wondering if we were just lame and went down too soon? Later that day, we discovered that all the climbing party’s on the West Buttress made the same decision. We reached an altitude of 18.000ft and know that if we take a day or two rest, we’re ready to get a try on the Cassin. Our days on the mountain are almost over so the only thing we need and are hoping for is a change in the weather. The next day, when we intercept a new weather forecast, we know it’s over. There is no break in this weather pattern, at least not to get a try on an engaged route like the Cassin Ridge. Frustrated that we spent a lot of energy on nothing, we quickly decide to back to the warm summer weather of Talkeetna.

The fast way down, ty two sledges together

The fast way down the Kahiltna glacier

Our plane back to Talkeetna

Our plane back to Talkeetna

Back at the Kahiltna Airstrip we are waiting for our plane to fly out. We’re sitting on the glacier, in what later turns out the last perfect day for a longer time. Eventually, if we were fast enough, we probably could climb the Cassin in a long day. But we didn’t feel comfortable trying such a route with unstable weather. Looking on the mountains around us, the massive moonflower buttress. It was our best trip ever and I’m sure I will come back to this place…

This expedition was possible thanks to: Read our previous articles:

Go Big in Alaska! Mt Hunter, Moonflower Buttress.

Alaska 2014 Part 1: Southwestfork acclimatization climb

Alaska 2014 Part 2: The Moonflower Buttress, Mt Hunter

Maxime and Yannick

Maxime and Sam back in Talkeetna

Changing minds : Pakistan into Greenland. Getting to the wall in Tasermiut.(first part)

Tags

, , , , ,

Het Karakorum gebergte,…..een droom voor elke klimmer die op zoek is naar grote granieten wanden, sneeuw en ijs. Al lang spookte het idee door men hoofd om ernaar toe te gaan en begin dit jaar besluiten Siebe Vanhee en ik om een ticket te kopen en aan de voorbereidingen te beginnen. Al snel kunnen we David Leduc overtuigen om mee te gaan en even later sluit diens Colombiaanse klimmaat Jairo Bogota nog bij ons aan.

Our initial K7 plan

Our initial K7 plan

Aanvankelijk baarde de politieke situatie ons weinig  zorgen, ok Pakistan is een gevaarlijk land en sinds de aanslag vorig jaar op het Nanga Parbat basecamp is de schrik om in de handen te komen van gewapende militanten bij veel klimmers toegekomen. Maar we zoeken veel op, doen navraag bij klimmers die al veel in Pakistan geweest zijn en daaruit is 1 ding duidelijk. Charakusa is relatief veilig vanwege zijn geïsoleerde ligging en de vele militaire posten die je door moet.

Half juni breken er plots weer onrusten los, een aanslag op de luchthaven van Karachi. Op zich baart dat ons weinig zorgen want wij vliegen op Islamabad en dat is er wel een eind vandaan. Wat ons wel zorgen baart zijn de rebellen die plots weer actief dreigen te worden in de streek rond Gilgit Baltistan,  waar wij naartoe gaan. Pffff…. Is het nog wel veilig? Pakken we niet te veel risico? Twijfels slaan toe en onze gedachten switchen heel de tijd. Wel gaan, niet gaan, wel gaan, niet gaan…. Een vermoeiende periode met redelijk wat stress, zeker omdat je nog veel geregeld moet krijgen en niet zeker weet of je wel zal kunnen gaan.

Niet veel later krijgen we nog een mail van FOD buitenlandse zaken die ons echt afraden om te gaan en ons bang maken met aanslagen, kidnappings,… Ook zal België geen losgeld betalen in geval van ontvoering.  Op zich is het normaal dat zij een reis naar Pakistan afraden,  en ze doen dat voor elk land met conflicten waarschijnlijk. Die mail kunnen we nog negeren, maar het zijn vooral familie en vrienden die zich vragen beginnen te stellen.

Soms donkere gedachten, dan weer optimistisch en positief. Het gaat nog een week hevig te keer in onze hoofden voor we uiteindelijk beslissen om niet te gaan.  Op een expeditie moet je vertrekken met een leeg hoofd en positieve gedachten, alleen op die manier kan je volgens mij je doel verwezenlijken.  Het was een moeilijke maar correcte beslissing, voor onszelf, maar vooral naar familie en vrienden toe. David neemt de beslissing om deze zomer nog in de alpen te blijven en voor Jairo is het ook te moeilijk om nog van plannen te veranderen.

Maar daar sta je dan plots met zen tweetjes. Alles geregeld, sponsoring bij elkaar gesprokkeld en eigenlijk gewoon klaar om op het vliegtuig te stappen. Maar het grote doel dat je 2 weken ervoor nog had is plots weg ! Het lijkt of al die weken planning ervoor allemaal voor niets zijn geweest. Het doet te veel pijn om gewoon thuis te blijven. Al snel beginnen we naar nieuwe gemakkelijk te plannen mogelijkheden te zoeken. Groenland ! goedkope vliegtuigtickets, geen permits, geen visa. Nog geen week na we beslist hebben om niet naar Pakistan te gaan hebben we al een nieuw doel. Het voelt goed om terug iets te hebben waarvoor je kan gaan.  Om het alles wat extra pit te geven besluiten we om 2 opblaasbare kajaks te kopen om ons zo te kunnen verplaatsen. Op aanraden van  enkele specialisten rijden we naar de grootste kanoshop in de Benelux. “Welke kajak is geschikt om en ons en 200kg klimmateriaal en eten te kunnen dragen?” vraag ik met een lichte twijfeling aan de verkoper. Hij fronst zijn wenkbrauwen ! wat  volgt zijn enkele uren testen, meten, gewichten afwegen. Een vlot verkooppaartje van Siebe zorgt ervoor dat we tegen het eind van de namiddag buiten stappen met 2 -2persoonskayaks. De sevylor Colorado ! Een simpele stevige boot ontworpen om zwaarlijvige amerikanen  over de rustige wateren van de Colorado rivier te laten varen. Ideaal voor ons, tezamen met een hoop eten en klimgerief goed voor 200kg.

Ulamertosruaq !

Ulamertosruaq !

Half juli arriveren we in Narsarsuaq. Omdat we 2 dagen moeten wachten op een boot die ons naar Nanortalik brengt lijkt het ons een goed plan om onze nieuwe marchandise al eens te testen. Het is een hilarisch moment als we plots vertrokken zijn om het 5km brede fjord vol met ijsbergen over te steken.  Zowel Siebe als ik zijn stevig onder de indruk ! het varen naast gigantische ijsbergen en de mogelijkheid dat er elk moment een walvis uit het water kan komen geeft een machtig en tegelijk heel spannend gevoel. Als we die avond onze tent opzetten en kunnen genieten van vers gevangen vis en mosselen kunnen we bijna niet geloven in wat voor een prachtige plek we zijn belandt. Zoals te lezen is op de flyers van het toerist  office : Greenland what a wonderfull place !

Typical Greenland house

Typical Greenland house

enjoying what Greenland has to offer : fish and mussels !

enjoying what Greenland has to offer : fish and mussels !

excitement !

excitement !

There's no better place to test a kayak

There’s no better place to test a kayak

Arctic Char !

Arctic Char !

In Nanortalik beseffen we dat het transport naar de plek van waaruit wij met de kano’s willen vertrekken nogal duur zal uitdraaien, en de kliminfo die we gehoopt hadden in het toerist office te vinden is ook nogal bekrompen, daarenboven hebben we een gigantische kater omdat enkele locals de dag voordien maar niet konden stoppen met trakteren. Plots is alles veel minder rooskleurig dan gehoopt.

Na wat rondvraag in het dorp stuit ik op 3 Noorse Zeilers die met hun boot een trip door Groenland maken. Jackpot ! De dag nadien zijn we al met hen onderweg naar Tasermiut fjord, Al was dit niet het aanvankelijke plan. Maar soms moet je kansen die op je afkomen gewoon grijpen. Het komt hard aan als we na 2 dagen luxueus varen plots gedropt worden in klosterdalen. Daar staan we dan met 200kg materiaal, terug aangewezen op onszelf en op  de hopelijk betrouwbare sevylor collorado.C'est parti !

C’est parti !

DCIM100GOPROIMG_0235

Markus, the captain !

Markus, the captain !

the sweets artic cruiser

the sweets artic cruiser

Dagelijkse hygiëne !

Dagelijkse hygiëne !

We maken een depot in de klosterdalen vallei en de volgende dag onderwerpen we onze kajaks aan hun eerste echt test : een 5km lange tocht op de wateren van de tasermiut fjod  tot onderaan de impressionante wanden van ulamertorsuaq en nalumertorsuaq. Daar zetten we ons basiskamp op en vervoegen we een team van, 4 luxemburgers en 2 duitsers.  We moeten dikwijls lachen met de Luxemburgers als ze weer eens in hun donkere grot zitten te wachten. Het lijkt erop dat deze 4 kerels van middelbare leeftijd eerder op een” ik wil weg van men vrouw trip” zijn dan een klimexpeditie. Het weer is schitterend en de temperatuur is ver boven onze verwachtingen. De dag erop lopen we richting nalumertorsuaq zonder topo of enige andere informatie. De wand ziet er stijl uit en in het midden loopt een logische lijn. Van  ver kunnen we niet echt zeggen hoe hoog de wand is dus we nemen alles mee om enkele dagen op de wand te kunnen verblijven. Portaledges, haulbags, water. Hoe dichter we naderen hoe meer het erop lijkt dat we de lijn die we op het oog hebben wel in 1 dag kunnen doen. Dus al snel laten we bivakmateriaal en portaledge halverwege. Na 5 lengte in de wand lijkt ook de haulbag een overbodige luxe. Back to Fast en light ! Heerlijk ! De ene handjam na de andere wisselt elkaar af en ongeveer halfweg is ons vel door de scherpe graniet al helemaal opengereten.

stilte na de storm

stilte na de storm

splitter time !

splitter time !

Nalumertorsuaq

Nalumertorsuaq

Maar wat een rotskwaliteit ! als de zon lager aan de horizon komt te staan denken we er bijna te zijn…Tot ik Siebe ineens hoor brullen 30 meter boven mij . Dan is duidelijk dat de crux nog moet komen. En wat voor één ! “handjam corner into full-body turnaround finger splitter” lijkt mij de beste manier om deze 5.12b passage te omschrijven. 2 eenvoudigere lengtes later is onze eerste top binnen via the Britisch route(VI 5.12+ 19 pitches, 600m). Raaccckkkkk!!!!  De dag nadien verschiet ik even als Siebe met aankijkt en blijkt dat 1 oog 5 keer dikker is dan het andere. We leggen dit unieke moment vast op foto en daarna dalen kwasimodo en ik verder af richting BC
IMG_0393IMG_0408

the crux pitch

the crux pitch

Jahhhhh!!!!!

Jahhhhh!!!!!

Siebe "Big Eye"Vanhee

Siebe “Big Eye” Vanhee

In het basiskamp doen we ons zo goed als elke dag te goed aan verse vis en mosselen.  Als je iets leest over Groenland gaat het meestal over Tasermiut fjord. Het is zowat  het meeste ontwikkelde en gemakkelijkste te bereiken gebied van heel zuid Groenland. Vele expedities hebben van Nalu en ulmertosrsuaq  een soort van Yosemite gemaakt. De relais bestaan meestal uit 2 haken, wat zowel  zekeren, haulen als rapellen safe en gemakkelijk maakt. Het avontuur waar wij voor kwamen gaat zo een beetje verloren, maar bon het toeval wil dat we gratis tot hier konden liften met de zeilboot en dit is een perfecte plek om al de big-wall technieken nog eens op de frissen.

ulalala !

ulalala !

Slabby start

Slabby start

Via de Luxemburgers vernemen we dat War en Poetry (VI 5.12c 31 pitches, 1000m) naast moby dick één van de beste vrijklimroutes is op de 1200m hoge wand van ulamertorsuaq, met veel offwidth’s …interessant ! Op het daleuze begin van War en poetry wordt onze nieuwe haulbag stevig opengereten. Het is leuk klimmen op knobs, flakes en andere soms bizarre feautures. Na 15 lengtes zetten we ons portaledge kamp op en genieten van onze vriesdroogmaaltijd met een fantastisch zicht op de fjord en de immense ijskap. Siebe is “the wall live” duidelijk nog niet verleerd, voor mij is het nog wat wennen en men eerste “shit off the wall” verloopt een pak minder gracieus als eerst gehoopt.

a l'attack !

a l’attack !

IMG_0512IMG_0446IMG_0527

Siebe shows me how it's done : the perfect sunset shit !

Siebe shows me how it’s done : the perfect sunset shit !

Een 7a+ en 7b+ zorgen voor een goede opwarming de dag nadien en we komen op het punt war de poetry overgaat in WAR. De barsten openen zich : offwidth size voor zover we kunnen zien. Zalig om nog eens goed te squeezen te brullen en te kreunen. We hebben alles mee om enkele dagen op de wand te kunnen blijven en na de 2 prachtige fingersplitter cruxlengtes op het einde van dag 2 zetten we ons 2de kamp op. En wat voor één !  Wat een leegte onder ons. Op z’on momenten besef je waarom je al die moeite doet om lengte na lengte dat dik vet varken van een haulbag omhoog te trekken. Windstil, 15 graden en geen wolkje aan de lucht. Waw dit is echt genieten ! Met nog 5 lengtes te gaan de dag erop laten we de haulbag achterwege.  Tegen de middag zijn we op de top van ulamertorsuaq, hebben we alle lengtes vrijgeklommen en is de 2de top in de sacoche.

second bivy

second bivy

War !

War !

Siebe enjoying himself

Siebe enjoying himself

Perfect 7b splitter

Perfect 7b splitter

IMG_0556IMG_0553

What to ask more for a last pitch....50m handjams

What to ask more for a last pitch….50m handjams

yaaaahhhh!!!!!

yaaaahhhh!!!!!

Zoals gepland verlaten we 3 dagen later het basiskamp en beginnen we aan luik 2 van de expeditie. De grote oversteek ! Daarover binnenkort meer.

Zonder hulp van sponsors was deze trip niet mogelijk geweest.
Dank aan : Petzl, North Face, Millet, care plus, Trek n’eat, Klean Kanteen, K2, Avventura, Five Ten, Julbo, Brunton, Kbf, kayakshop Arjan Bloem en Bvkb.

naamloos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zweten in Thailand en blauwe tenen in de alpen

Tags

, , , , ,

Dat we (Jasper en Aurélie) ooit eens naar Thailand zouden gaan stond al lang vast. Maar deze zomer bleken de tickets goedkoop waardoor de keuze snel gemaakt was. Het oorspronkelijke plan was 1 á 2 weken klimmen en dan nog wat cultuur opsnuiven. Met 2 rugzakken, eentje met klimgerief en één met de andere spullen vertrokken we richting Phuket. Dat het regenseizoen was werd ons de eeste dag direct duidelijk. De regen viel er een volledige dag non-stop uit de lucht. Op zo dagen is er dan ook niets anders te doen dan door te reizen naar de klimgebieden. Na een tussenstop in Koh Phi Phi kwame we aan op railay beach. Een schiereiland met zowel aan de kust als landinwaarts rotswanden. Ook het bekende Tonsai ligt op dit schiereiland.


Tonsai wall vanaf Pranang beachTonsai wall vanaf Pranang beach

Dat we (Jasper en Aurélie) ooit eens naar Thailand zouden gaan stond al lang vast. Maar deze zomer bleken de tickets goedkoop waardoor de keuze snel gemaakt was. Het oorspronkelijke plan was 1 á 2 weken klimmen en dan nog wat cultuur opsnuiven. Met 2 rugzakken, eentje met klimgerief en één met de andere spullen vertrokken we richting Phuket. Dat het regenseizoen was werd ons de eeste dag direct duidelijk. De regen viel er een volledige dag non-stop uit de lucht. Op zo dagen is er dan ook niets anders te doen dan door te reizen naar de klimgebieden. Na een tussenstop in Koh Phi Phi kwame we aan op railay beach. Een schiereiland met zowel aan de kust als landinwaarts rotswanden. Ook het bekende Tonsai ligt op dit schiereiland.  FOTO: Tonsai wall vanaf Pranang beach FOTO: Wat is er beter om aan de klimsteil gewoon te worden dan wat te boulderen?  Het klimmen bij een minimum temperatuur van 30 graden blijkt er heel afwisselend te zijn. Je vindt er rechte muren, extreme overhangen, regletten en druipstenen. Na een dagje boulderen was het tijd voor de langere routes. Al snel merk je dat niet alle haken even stevig zijn. De klassieke plaquettes die overal terug te vinden zijn in de alpen blijken het hier maar 6 maanden uit te houden. Na een jaar blijft er niet meer dan en roestig spoor over. Van de grote massa klimmers, die waarschijnlijk enkel in het droog seizoen komen, was geen spoor te bespeuren. De rust aan de massieven in combinatie met het heerlijke eten en prachtige stranden maakt van deze plek een waar paradijs. Al werd dit even onderuit gehaald door een voedsevergiftiging. Maar meer dan een dagje ziekenhuis en een week diarree was het ook niet.  Voor Deep water soloing was de zee jammer genoeg niet rustig genoeg. Maar daarvoor keren we nog wel eens terug! FOTO: de dagelijke zonsondergang vanop Railay West FOTO: Klimmen in de jungle  FOTO: Aurélie waagt de overstap op One-two-three FOTO: Technisch klimmen op Escher wall FOTO: Opletten voor wespenesten en arrogante apen in Diamond Cave.  FOTO: Alles onder het toeziend oog van de beste klimmers van de streek! 2 weken later was het tijd om nog eens naar de alpen af te reizen. Ik zou er een 2tal weken met Jonas (MC3) beklimmingen proberen te realiseren. Maar zoals alom bekend zat het weer deze zomer niet echt mee. Na een acclimatietocht naar Grand Cornier vanaf Lac de Moiry in mooi weer sloegen de voorspellingen wat om. Enkele dagen gaan klimmen aan de grimselpas leek ons dan ook een mooi tussendoortje. In de gietende regen kwamen we aan in Gutannen. De volgende dag zouden we fair hands line klimmen. Een klassieker die al vanaf de eerste lengte niet zo eenvoudig leek als de topo aangeeft. Het opnieuw wennen aan moeilijk af te zekeren dalpassen zal hier misschien ook iets mee te makn hebben. Naarmate de lengtes volgen gaat het ook steeds vlotter en vlotter. Na de lange afdaling langs de trappen van de lift klommen we nog een korte route aan de ander kant van de vallei.  FOTO: Jonas op de graat van Grand Cornier.  FOTO: Jonas in één van de laatste lengtes van fair hands line FOTO: Ondanks het liften mochten we niet mee… De 2de dag vertrokken we vrij laat, opstaan lukt nog steeds niet zo goed, in de richting van Eldorado. Dit is een massieve rotswand op zo een 2u wandelen van de stuwdam. Iets voor 12u begonnen we te klimmen in Möterhead. De dalpassen blijken hier ook zeer sportief afgezekerd te zijn. De eerste lengtes gaan vlot tot in een dulferpas mijn rug opnieuw veel pijn begint te doen. Enkele lengtes verder kan ik bijna niet meer over mn schouder kijken. Rapellen lijkt de juiste beslissing en net voor de eerste regen staan we terug aan de auto.  FOTO: Jasper in de fijne vingerbarst van de 3de lengte van Möterhead.  Na nog een overschreiding van de la sage – pleureur en la luette in Wallis voelden we ons fit om eindelijk terug in te stijgen naar de leschaux-hut. De condities van de Croz-pijler op de noordwand van Grandes Jorasses bleken goed te zijn. Toen we echter in de gietende regen en ijzige wind aan de hut kwamen, werd deze beklimming ons echter afgeraden. Het zou de volgende dag goed weer zijn, maar ’s nachts opnieuw sneeuwen en de volgende dag kans op onweer. Bovendien zou de afdaling naar de boccalatte-hut levensgevaarlijk worden door het lawinegevaar. De overstap naar Petit Macintyre was vlug gemaakt. De route loopt links van de linceuil en volgt eerst een goulotte langs de rotswand. Halverwege stapt ze over naar een goulotte meer links waar het ook wat steiler wordt. Omdat slaap belangrijk is staan we een uur later dan gepland op. Zowel de instijg als het eerste deel van de route gaan vlot. Door de vele sneeuw moest alles gespoord worden, wat in de mist niet altijd eenvoudig was. Het eerste deel bleek vooral fysiek zwaar. Het 2de deel bleek uit goed ijs te bestaan waardoor we goed snelheid konden maken. Dit was ook nodig. Rond 10u komt de zon op de rotwand net naast de route en komt er conitu spindrift, ijspegels en rotsen naar beneden. 15 abalakovs later staan we terug aan de voet. Tijdens de verdere afdaling werden we opneiuw getrakteerd op hevige regenbuien en een ijzige wind. Tegen 10u ’s avonds staan we terug in Chamonix. Allezins een mooie afsluiter van de zomer!

Wat is er beter om aan de steil de wennen dan wat te boulderen?

Het klimmen bij een minimum temperatuur van 30 graden blijkt er heel afwisselend te zijn. Je vindt er rechte muren, extreme overhangen, regletten en druipstenen. Na een dagje boulderen was het tijd voor de langere routes. Al snel merk je dat niet alle haken even stevig zijn. De klassieke plaquettes die overal terug te vinden zijn in de alpen blijken het hier maar 6 maanden uit te houden. Na een jaar blijft er niet meer dan en roestig spoor over. Van de grote massa klimmers, die waarschijnlijk enkel in het droog seizoen komen, was geen spoor te bespeuren. De rust aan de massieven in combinatie met het heerlijke eten en prachtige stranden maakt van deze plek een waar paradijs. Al werd dit even onderuit gehaald door een voedsevergiftiging. Maar meer dan een dagje ziekenhuis en een week diarree was het ook niet.
Voor Deep water soloing was de zee jammer genoeg niet rustig genoeg. Maar daarvoor keren we nog wel eens terug!


DSC_4430de dagelijke zonsondergang vanop Railay West


DSC_4536Klimmen in de jungle


P1000672Aurélie waagt de overstap op One-two-three

P1000692
Technisch klimmen op Escher wall

P1000734Opletten voor wespenesten en arrogante apen in Diamond Cave.

DSC_4516 Alles onder het toeziend oog van de beste klimmers van de streek!

2 weken later was het tijd om nog eens naar de alpen af te reizen. Ik zou er een 2tal weken met Jonas (MC3) beklimmingen proberen te realiseren. Maar zoals alom bekend zat het weer deze zomer niet echt mee. Na een acclimatietocht naar Grand Cornier vanaf Lac de Moiry in mooi weer sloegen de voorspellingen wat om. Enkele dagen gaan klimmen aan de grimselpas leek ons dan ook een mooi tussendoortje. In de gietende regen kwamen we aan in Gutannen. De volgende dag zouden we fair hands line klimmen. Een klassieker die al vanaf de eerste lengte niet zo eenvoudig leek als de topo aangeeft. Het opnieuw wennen aan moeilijk af te zekeren dalpassen zal hier misschien ook iets mee te makn hebben. Naarmate de lengtes volgen gaat het ook steeds vlotter en vlotter. Na de lange afdaling langs de trappen van de lift klommen we nog een korte route aan de ander kant van de vallei.

P1000785 Jonas op de graat van Grand Cornier.

P1000797 Jonas in één van de laatste lengtes van fair hands line

P1000800Ondanks het liften mochten we niet mee…

De 2de dag vertrokken we vrij laat, opstaan lukt nog steeds niet zo goed, in de richting van Eldorado. Dit is een massieve rotswand op zo een 2u wandelen van de stuwdam. Iets voor 12u begonnen we te klimmen in Möterhead. De dalpassen blijken hier ook zeer sportief afgezekerd te zijn. De eerste lengtes gaan vlot tot in een dulferpas mijn rug opnieuw veel pijn begint te doen. Enkele lengtes verder kan ik bijna niet meer over mn schouder kijken. Rapellen lijkt de juiste beslissing en net voor de eerste regen staan we terug aan de auto.

P1000807 Jasper in de fijne vingerbarst van de 3de lengte van Möterhead.

Na nog een overschreiding van de la sage – pleureur en la luette in Wallis voelden we ons fit om eindelijk terug in te stijgen naar de leschaux-hut. De condities van de Croz-pijler op de noordwand van Grandes Jorasses bleken goed te zijn. Toen we echter in de gietende regen en ijzige wind aan de hut kwamen, werd deze beklimming ons echter afgeraden. Het zou de volgende dag goed weer zijn, maar ’s nachts opnieuw sneeuwen en de volgende dag kans op onweer. Bovendien zou de afdaling naar de boccalatte-hut levensgevaarlijk worden door het lawinegevaar. De overstap naar Petit Macintyre was vlug gemaakt. De route loopt links van de linceuil en volgt eerst een goulotte langs de rotswand. Halverwege stapt ze over naar een goulotte meer links waar het ook wat steiler wordt. Omdat slaap belangrijk is staan we een uur later dan gepland op. Zowel de instijg als het eerste deel van de route gaan vlot. Door de vele sneeuw moest alles gespoord worden, wat in de mist niet altijd eenvoudig was. Het eerste deel bleek vooral fysiek zwaar. Het 2de deel bleek uit goed ijs te bestaan waardoor we goed snelheid konden maken. Dit was ook nodig. Rond 10u komt de zon op de rotwand net naast de route en komt er conitu spindrift, ijspegels en rotsen naar beneden. 15 abalakovs later staan we terug aan de voet. Tijdens de verdere afdaling werden we opneiuw getrakteerd op hevige regenbuien en een ijzige wind. Tegen 10u ’s avonds staan we terug in Chamonix. Alleszins een mooie afsluiter van de zomer!

P1000851Jonas met op de achtergrond Le Pleureur

 

P1000871Jonas halverwege de eerste goulotte in Petit Macintyre

P1000868Prachtige zonsopgang boven petites Jorasses

P1100077Jasper bij de overstap naar de linkse goulotte

P1100081Jasper in de voorlaatste lengte.

Met dank aan K2 en Julbo!

Alpine summer rain: MC5 ervaringsstage

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , ,

Rochefort

disappearing into the clouds ©Sanne

Terwijl Mount Coach zijn zonen over de wereld uitstuurt op zoek naar nieuwe avonturen (Alaska, Groenland, Noorwegen, Canada en andere mooie bestemmingen), is de jongste generatie nog in opleiding. Over een jaar trekken ook de jongens van MC5 op expeditie, maar eerst is er tijd om ervaring op te doen in hun derde opleidingsjaar. Deze zomer waren de condities allesbehalve ideaal, maar juist in slecht weer en minder goede condities kan je veel bijleren.

Primel-Tregastel

excellent weather… in Brittany ©Sanne

An en ik zouden deze ervaringsstage begeleiden. Omdat An volop aan het revalideren is en nog verre van veel geklommen had op haar recent geopereerde enkel, trokken we er eerst even samen op uit. De weerkaarten lieten ons weinig keuze en we belanden aan de noordkust van Bretagne. Daar kan je perfect op graniet klimmen, aan de zee. Het is niet in de buurt, maar als je dan toch die kant uit moet rijden, ga dan zeker eens klimmen in Primel-Tregastel. De camping aan het strand is ideaal. Na drie dagen ‘vakantie’, wacht ons de lange rit dwars door Frankrijk, richting Italië.

Lac d'Emosson

Acqua Concert on Aiguilles du Van ©Sanne

Na een korte tussenstop in Chamonix, waar we nog een mooie multipitch klimmen aan het meer van Emosson, Acqua Concert op Aiguilles du Van, rijden we over de Grand St. Bernard naar de plaats van afspraak in Val Ferret aan de zuidkant van het Mont Blanc-massief. De mannen van MC5 hadden in de voorafgaande week ook al de nodige hoogtemeters gedaan, met onder andere beklimmingen op de Tiangle du Tacul en Aiguille Croux, maar altijd in minder goed weer. Dat zou helaas niet veranderen.

Arêtes Peuterey intégrales ©Sanne

Arêtes Peuterey intégrales ©Sanne

De weerkaarten zijn gewoon nergens gunstig, dus we besluiten om er het beste van te maken aan de Italiaanse kant van de Mont Blanc. Dit minder drukke gebied met amper liften leent zich uitstekend voor mooie en langere beklimmingen. Er kan ook naar het gebied rond de Gran Paradiso of Monte Rosa uitgeweken worden. Maar de eerste stagedagen is het al erg slecht weer. Desondanks beklimmen we de Pyramides Calcaires aan het eind van Val Veny om alvast het klimmen met verkort touw af te stoffen.

On the edge ©Sanne

On the edge ©Sanne

Deze graat staat, voor zover ik weet, in geen enkele topo beschreven. Maar de ruwe kalk leent zich uitstekend om zelfs in nat weer te kunnen klimmen. De graat is ruim 2km lang en is makkelijk met grote schoenen te beklimmen, maar vraagt veel aanpassingen aan de inbindmethodes en is ideaal didactisch terrein. Door een losbarstend onweer moeten we kort voor de top uitwijken. Totaal uitgeregend keren we terug naar onze camping.

Fun climbing in the rain ©Sanne

Fun climbing in the rain ©Sanne

Na nog een dag regenweer, waarbij het moeilijk is om alles weer droog te krijgen, laat ik de mannen een mooie beklimming voorbereiden op de Gran Paradiso. Er zijn twee opties: ofwel de noordgraat via de Piccolo Paradiso ofwel de noordwestwand van de Gran Paradiso. De huttenwirt van Victor Emmanuele zegt ons dat die laatste niet in conditie ligt, dus er wordt gekozen voor de noordgraat. We stijgen vanuit Cogne in naar het Bivacco Leonessa.

@Leonessa bivouac ©Sanne

@Leonessa bivouac ©Sanne

sunrise

Sunrise during the approach to Gran Paradiso ©Sanne

De volgende ochtend verliezen we al gauw veel tijd door het vermoeiende sporen over de gletsjer, wanneer we kniediep in de halfbevroren sneeuw zakken. Na enkele uren komen we aan de Becca di Montandayne, die we moeten beklimmen om op de graat te komen. De sneeuw is veel te zacht en de beklimming van deze Becca is moeilijker dan verwacht. Op de col onderaan Piccolo Paradiso nemen we het wijze besluit om langs de  steile noordwand af te dalen tot aan de Rifugio Chabod.

Becca di Montandayne 3838m ©Sanne

Becca di Montandayne 3838m ©Sanne

Steep descent ©Sanne

Steep descent ©Sanne

Daar zien we dat de noordwestwand van de Gran Paradiso in uitstekende conditie ligt en ik vervloek de slechte informatie van de huttenwirt, een gemiste kans! Maar ook dat is ervaring opdoen. Dit gebied rond de Gran Paradiso, waar ook bijna geen beschrijvingen van bestaan, biedt alleszins nog vele mogelijkheden. En dan spreek ik niet over de platgelopen normaalroute van de hoogste berg aldaar.

Gran Paradiso NW-face in excellent conditions ©Sanne

Gran Paradiso NW-face in excellent conditions ©Sanne

Dit eerste ‘weatherwindow’ hebben we alvast niet kunnen benutten en de volgende periode van slecht weer dient zich alweer aan. Maar voor het echt slecht wordt, beklimmen we nog snel een mooie multipitch aan het eind van de vallei, ‘Venus’ op Parete dei Titani. De mannen klimmen nog mooi verkeerd en komen in de veel zwaardere route Ahi-Ahi-Ahi uit, een so-so geëquipeerde 6c+ ;-) Ervaringsstage weetjewel.

Alternative program, roped-up oriënteering in the woods ©An

Alternative program, roped-up oriënteering in the woods ©An

De volgende dag gaan we ingebonden oriënteren in de bossen en flanken rondom de camping, waarbij het terrein door mij telkens fictief aangepast wordt, waardoor ze voortdurend moeten veranderen van inbindmethode. Al bij al toch een heel nuttige dag, waarbij we zelfs spaltenberging herzien tussen de bomen.

improvised crevasse-rescue ©An

improvised crevasse-rescue ©An

Een onzeker weatherwindow maakt dat we de volgende dagen gaan doorbrengen in de rifugio Torino, het plan is om in twee groepen de eerste dag te gaan voor de mooie Arêtes de Rochefort en de noordwand van de Tour Ronde. Door het onzekere weerbericht, is er amper volk in de hut en dat blijkt de volgende dag een meevaller. In de Tour Ronde noordwand, die Denis, Friedemann, Kristof en Jeroen beklimmen, is geen enkele andere cordée en op de arête Rochefort die nog niet gespoord is, komen Niels, Sebastiaan, An en ik slechts twee andere cordées tegen.

Early morning light over the  Mont Blanc ©Sanne

Early morning light over the Mont Blanc ©Sanne

First tracks on Rochefort Ridge ©Sanne

First tracks on Rochefort Ridge ©Sanne

We halen die cordées in en An krijgt uiteindelijk de eer om de scherpe graat als eerste te sporen. Het gebeurt zelden dat je deze populaire graat in ideale omstandigheden kan beklimmen. In de Tour Ronde noordwand maken Kristof en Jeroen het verschil door 90% van de route simultaan te klimmen, waarbij Denis en Friedemann het wat voorzichtiger aan doen, maar dus trager zijn. Snelheid in een beklimming maak je niet alleen door een goede fysieke conditie, maar vooral door de optimale aanwending van de ideale touwtechnieken. Snelheid is veiligheid!

An in the mixte climbing on Aiguille de Rochefort ©Sanne

An in the mixte climbing on Aiguille de Rochefort ©Sanne

Op de terugweg van de Rochefort, besluiten Niels en Sebastiaan om ‘nog snel’ even de Dent du Géant te beklimmen. Dat kan snel gaan, maar er zitten ondertussen al weer een hoop toeristen in en ze komen in de file terecht. Ze zijn nog net op tijd voor het avondeten terug in de hut. Ervaring ;-)
Het ideale plan was om de volgende dag allemaal tezamen de Kuffnergraat te beklimmen op de Mont Maudit, maar het weer blijkt de volgende dag toch niet zo stabiel en na een korte beklimming van de Aiguilles Marbrées, nemen we de lift weer naar beneden.

classic ridge climbing ©Sanne

classic ridge climbing ©Sanne

De studenten met herexamens moeten hierna helaas naar huis terugkeren en we blijven met vier achter. Maar eerst sluiten we de stage in stijl af met een bbq, waarbij we enkele verse zalmforellen uit de rivier op perfecte wijze klaarmaken in de kolen.

Salmon Trout ©An

Salmon Trout ©An

Perfect BBQ ©Sanne

Perfect BBQ ©Sanne

Samen met Kristof en Friedemann, stijgen An en ik in naar de prachtige Rifugio Dalmazzi, waar we nog profiteren van twee dagen mooi weer en enkele zeer mooie rotsbeklimmingen kunnen doen. Na de instijg beklimmen we ineens ‘Ultimo Viaggio’ en ‘La Ragazza d’Ipanema’, twee langere routes in de nabijheid van de hut met iets mindere kwaliteit van rots.

Friedemann in 'La Ragazza d'Ipanema' ©Sanne

Friedemann in ‘La Ragazza d’Ipanema’ ©Sanne

De tweede dag maken we een combinatie van twee langere routes en beklimmen zo de mooie zuidwand van les Monts Rouges de Triolet. An en ik beklimmen de sokkel via A-Loba Loba, waarbij de derde lengte ongemeen hard is en eigenlijk niet in de rest van de route past. Maar daarna krijgen we een mooie  beloning met de prachtige route ‘Cristallina’. Friedemann en Kristof vergissen zich in de sokkel en vinden niet de geplande route ‘Vento Polare’. Ze volgen ons uiteindelijk en beklimmen daarna ‘Profumo Prohibito’

No access to this route! ©Sanne

No access to this route! ©Sanne

An in the third pitch of A-Loba Loba ©Sanne

An in the third pitch of A-Loba Loba ©Sanne

An in the crux of Cristallina ©Sanne

An in the crux of Cristallina ©Sanne

Na nog een gezellige avond in de Rifugio Dalmazzi, zit het er helaas op. We dalen af en keren onafhankelijk van elkaar terug naar huis. An en ik gaan eerst nog eens eten in het beste restaurant van de vallei, het super onbekende ‘la Marenda Sinoira‘ (Aanrader!!!), waar je voor €3 de beste carpaccio ter wereld kan eten. Daarna bezoeken we de mooie Zwitserse stad Luzern (de carpaccio kost hier CHF 28 en is niet te vreten) en via nog een bivakje in de Vogezen rijden we naar huis, waar de werf met al zijn zorgen op ons staat te wachten.

La Marenda Sinoira ©An

La Marenda Sinoira ©An

Tot zover dit beknopte verslag van mooie beklimmingen en culinaire hoogstandjes. Uitkijken naar het verslag van echt serieuze beklimmingen, Tim en Siebe keren binnenkort terug uit Groenland.
Sanne

Alaska 2014 Part 2: The Moonflower Buttress, Mt Hunter

Tags

, , , , , ,

Moonflower Buttress

Mt Hunter, Moonflower Buttress, Bibler Klewin (1800m, VI 5.8 WI6 M6 A2)

“The fear of the unknown”, some words just stick to my (Sam ) mind. It was that fear we felt stronger then ever that evening. Maxime De Groote, my partner for a lot of the harder climbs, was silent too. For over a week we’re in the Central Alaska Range. To warm up and acclimatise we climbed 2 smaller routes, before we got hit by a period of bad weather. Tent bound at Kahiltna base camp, we’re passing our time by staring at the ceiling, listening to music or trying to read a book. After 4 days in a complete whiteout, the warmth of the sun finally greets us. Soon the forecast shows us what we were waiting for, at least 4 days of blue sky. We make a last scouting trip to check the conditions on the huge face before us and inspect the descent options. It all looks promising so soon we decide to go for the main goal of this expedition: The Moonflower Buttress.

Tentbound

4 days Tentbound

It’s already late afternoon. We feel a bit exhausted from our hike on the heat reflecting glacier but start to pack our bags. The typical decision making discussions soon follows? How many screws are we bringing? A full set of cams? 3 days of food or do we count for an extra day? How heavy is your pack compared to mine? Do we try to make one small pack for the hard leads?

While we're sorting out our gear

While we’re sorting out our gear

In the early evening, our bags are ready to go and we prepare an extended meal. We’re both silent, and somehow I’m getting nervous with that massive buttress looming at our back. From time to time I turn around. Slowly, as the sun sets, the yellow-brown granite with small white-grey lines of ice turns into an impressive orange formation. From some small talk with Maxime I switch over to my inner thoughts. Luckily, he feels as restless as I do. Our bags are ready to go, the weather is perfect but somehow we’re mentally not ready yet. Not to leave now, neither to leave early in the morning. We decide to postpone our departure until the next day at noon, to give our body and mind some extra time to rest.

Time to eat

Time to eat

Salmon

Salmon

It’s difficult to fall asleep if you are nervous. In my mind I’m digging into my past, and suddenly I remember, a small talk with someone else always helped me. Staring at that favorite tent ceiling I’m waiting till it’s late enough to make a call with Yannick, a good friend and climbing partner. We’ve been climbing, skiing and travelling together the last 8 years. We share lots of highs and lows, which makes me feel really connected to him. And maybe we are, as I still remember my ex-girlfriend complaining I saw him more than her…

As usual if he can’t go on a trip, he’s following our progress from home. Helping us out where he can because he has better access to weather maps. Raising his 3 months old daughter, “Zoen” (the Dutch word for Kiss) he will probably be up early. So, that’s why I call him at 7 in the morning European time. A sleepy voice answers the phone. Zoen seems to sleeps longer then I expected. Because I woke him up with terrible news 4 years ago, I immediately let him know everything is still perfect. I tell him we’re ready for the climb and ask if he can send us a last weather update. His sleepy mourning voice replies something like; “If you ready to go you need to go, last time I checked this was a perfect weather window. Good luck…”

Little did he know? In that 1-minute call he said almost nothing but nevertheless his words calmed me down immediately. I simply needed to let him know we’re on the move. Like I needed that confirmation that he knows we’re on that mountain.

140507_ALAS_IMG_0553_LoRes

Next day, Friday 9th of May around noon, we hike underneath the base of the Moonflower Buttress. We’re surprised to see another climbing party at the shrund of the Bibler Klewin and even more to see a guy coming back from the right-hand side of the Buttress. As he comes closer we recognise him, it’s Scott Adamson, a funny guy with a moustache coming from Zion, US. A few days before we met Scott and shared some funny stories about climbing, America and it’s alcohol policies. Together with Aaron Child and Andy Knight, he climbed a new route on Idiot Peak, a satellite of Mt. Huntington. He and his partners flew over from the Tokositna glacier last week. His friends felt sick and stayed in basecamp but Scott went for a solo attempt on the Deprivation route. Unfortunately he had to come back down as the crux was in loose snow. We have a little chat about the conditions and the fresh snow before he wishes us luck and we move on.

Gear up for the climb

Sam and Maxime gearing up for the climb

Thanks to the party upfront we progress rapidly in the knee-deep snow, which is accumulated underneath the buttress. We follow their traces to what looks like the only possible way trough the massive shrund, a 5-meter overhanging snow and ice formation. We climb it with the help of some aid techniques and start climbing the lower ice field. As far as we know, there was Max and Rustie, an Anchorage party and the Dutch couple Marianne and Dennis. Both had plans to make an ascent but they both opted to leave a day later. So wondering who is in front of us, we try to catch up with them. Eventually it turns out to be another American party that flew in yesterday evening. 2 pitches further they turn back because they felt too tired.

Sam traversing the lower ice field

Sam traversing the lower ice field to acces the twin runnels

We approach the first small gully of ice, which is named the Twin Runnels. Maxime takes the first lead in these runnels and we are both immediately surprised. The runnel is steep, small and in polystyrene snow. Perfect for climbing but placing good protection is almost impossible. Luckily for us, the protection gets better from the next pitch on. Although an occasional nasty move above that last piece of gear keeps our focus high and our progress rather slow! It somehow sets a tone of the day and what we later discover, the whole climb.

Maxime climbing in the twin runnels. You can see the prow above us

Maxime climbing in the twin runnels. You can see the prow above us

It is late afternoon when we reach our belay underneath the obvious rock feature, which is called The Prow. An aid pitch that is more and more climbed free. While Maxime puts on his down jacket for a longer belay session, I fuel myself with some extra food and I gear up. Not that I think I will free this, but I should give it a try. Some nasty moves later and I’m hanging on my gear, continuing with a mix of aid and free climbing. Maxime makes the pendulum into the McNerthney Ice Dagger from where we climb up to the start of Tamara’s Traverse.

Sam starting in the prow

Sam starting in the prow

Maxime on the belay in the snow while Sam is leading the prow, picture by Zach Clanton

Maxime on the belay in the snow while Sam is leading the prow, picture by Zach Clanton ( http://www.zachclantonphotography.com )

Sam climbing up the lower McNerthney Ice Dagger

Sam climbing up the lower McNerthney Ice Dagger

Because of our late start today we arrive in the evening. As the sky turns red, the view is more then impressive but as there is no place to sleep, we can’t rest yet. We need to hurry to reach the first ice field before dark. Maxime starts the traverse giving me an exceptional photographic opportunity. Slowly the sun sets and at the time I reach the next belay it is almost dark. We simulclimb the last 100 meters and around midnight we start chopping 2 small ledges under a boulder on the first ice field.

Maxime leading tamara's traverse

Maxime leading Tamara’s Traverse

We both feel miserable and tired. While we get into our sleeping bags, fresh spindrift comes down from the mountain and we need to make sure they don’t get wet. We start to melt snow and heat up water but with these cold temperatures it takes ages. I put the gas canister in the hot water for a few seconds so the stove can burn on full power for a minute afterwards and so on. We start to talk about interesting heating systems and wonder why no company found a light system to keep the gas canister warm. As we both try not to fall asleep, we fill up our Nalgene bottles with tea and a vegetable soup. We force ourselves to drink and eat enough so it is around 3 in the morning when we finally fall asleep.

Next morning we didn’t set an alarm but woke up by the morning light. The heat of the sun will be more then welcome but we know the sun hits this face only late in the evening. Cold and tired, we stay in our sleeping bags while we brew up some water and eat some dry biscuits. We’re both staring to the lower glacier in search of fresh traces. Wondering if a strong party made an early start and is climbing behind us. Knowing we’re not alone up here, would give us the motivation we need at this moment.

Knowing we’re both feeling miserable, and it’s easy to take each other down in a form of demotivation. We make some small talk and avoid the topic of an optional retreat. In this position, you don’t feel the joy of climbing and with the sun shining on the lower glacier. It’s just so easy to get back on your steps. I tell myself retreat is no option as long as the weather stays good and the route is climbable. We encourage ourselves to get out of that sleeping bag and it is only around noon when we finally start again. We climb some easy terrain and I take shelter behind a rock formation as there is a hanging snow mushroom the size of a car looming above the next pitch, the 5.8.

A beautiful night

A beautiful night

Early morning at our first bivy

Early morning at our first bivy

We heard some rumours that this pitch is harder then graded. Maxime, without question the better rock climber, takes an awesome lead, tries to move as fast as possible underneath the nasty mushroom and brings me up. Now, we’re standing underneath the feature that gave us the most doubts. The shaft, a 120m steep ice runnel with some overhanging steps. From the first look on the mountain we saw this thin grey line with a snow mushroom hanging in the first pitch. Climbing up this narrow gully I manage to get underneath this mushroom. Getting over it takes ages, placing protection, figuring out the moves, trying to get over it and turning back to the safe place to take a rest. That never ending internal dialog that I should go for it, which was encouraged by Maxime. Although this block of snow only had the size of a big duffle, it really scared us. Knowing we won’t get further without touching, I try to clear the mushroom so it won’t fall down on Maxime. Then suddenly it breaks loose and falls down without any trouble. I manage to climb the first overhang and really psyched I bring Maxime up. He takes the next lead, again with a loose snow-overhanging step.

Although every pitch was difficult so far, way out of our comfort zone and really close to our limits. We need to say, unlike the lower polystyrene twin runnels, we had no problem placing good protection almost everywhere. Standing in a split, Maxime works himself trough the second overhanging step and the third pitch of the shaft is back for me. It’s another steep one, my arms getting pumpy, I simply don’t manage to climb the whole length and have to give the last 15 meters back to Maxime. With the last rays of sun we reach the second icefield and start digging for a place to sleep. We climbed roughly 10 hours for only 8 pitches! We are exhausted, feeling terribly slow. But with the crux behind us, and weather still good to go on, we don’t let it bother us too much.

Maxime climbing over the second bulge in the shaft

Maxime climbing over the second bulge in the shaft

Sam starting of the 3th pitch of the shaft

Sam starting of the 3th pitch of the shaft

Our second Bivy

Our second Bivy

We manage to get a good sleep and wake up early for our third day on the mountain. From the ground we never had a good view on the “Vision” and the “Bibler Come Again Exit” leading trough the 2 last rock bands. And even up here, the right way looks unfamiliar. We follow the most obvious line and soon arrive at the start of the Vision. Due to a stuck rope, it takes a while but eventually we’re looking into the final ice runnel leading to the third ice field. The sun hits this field early so it feels great to finally enjoy the full heat of the sun. We climb trough the ice field, up to the right and start to search for the weakness in the last rock band, the ice runnel leading to “The Bibler Come Again Exit”. It’s over here that I made a big mistake.

Maxime climbing out of the vision while my camera is having some problems with moisture

Maxime climbing out of the vision while my camera is having some problems with moisture

The last runnel to the 3th ice field

The last runnel to the 3th ice field

Sam romping op the thirty ice field

Sam romping op the thirty ice field

Climbing up a small thin layer of ice, I place one last good screw underneath a steep step and try to climb over it. One axe in perfect ice just above the step, I start looking for my other axe placement but only find snow. Eventually my axe finds a hold. And, you know that feeling, when you place your axe and just the sound just tells you it’s not right. I was well aware of that moment, but instead of trying again, I tested it with my weight and the axe kept in place. Time to come high up, holding almost all of my weight on the lower axe using the other to stay in balance. And then, the bad axe rips out. I’m way too high above my good axe. While I’m falling backwards, I hold my only good axe at its head. Obvious I rip that one out too!

Suddenly, I find myself hanging 2 meters lower upside down, on that that tiny 8mm Ice Line. Looking to a glacier 1500 meters beneath me, I scared the shit out of Maxime and feel frustrated that I trusted that situation on such a route. I made a short but perfect fall and I didn’t hurt myself. Lowering myself back to the belay point of Maxime we take a short rest. Afraid doubts will take over, I soon go for a second try. This time, we climb over it, Maxime leads another length and we are standing underneath the last difficult pitch of this amazing route. We still don’t know if it is really “The Bibler Come Again Exit” but it was the most obvious feature.

The way trough the last rock band. One minute later and Sam made his fall

The way trough the last rock band. One minute later and Sam made his fall

Maxime climbing trough the last rock band

Maxime climbing trough the last rock band

Sam climbing the last hard pitch, we're still wondering if this or the lefthand ice smear is the original route

Sam climbing the last hard pitch, we’re still wondering if this or the lefthand ice smear is the original route

Finally, we’re on top of the difficulties, a point of return for a lot of climbing parties but with the weather still on our side we opt to move on. We start the 10 pitches on calf breaking 50 degree blue ice. Too tired to simulclimb it safely, we pitch it all out. As usual we lose track of time and reach the top of the buttress when it’s almost dark. We find the cornice bivy. A perfect cave blown out by the wind but standing here, underneath a huge cornice we didn’t fancy to sleep and make a traverse to the other side of the ridge. Later on we discovered that this is a well-known bivy spot but we’re surprised to find a boulder that forms a good platform for what hopefully would be our last night on the mountain.

The calf braking blue ice on top of the buttress

The calf braking blue ice on top of the buttress

When fatigue comes into the game

When fatigue comes into the game

The last meters before we can catch some sleep

The last meters before we can catch some sleep

The effort of the last days makes us fall asleep easily. But didn’t necessarily make us have a goo night. From time to time we wake up by the cold or the fear of falling down this boulder. When the sun hits our faces early in the morning we pack our bags and start following the ridge to the summit. Navigating trough seracs, climbing loose snow and following the ridge we slowly get higher. Despite our acclimatisation trips a good week ago, we still feel the altitude. We arrive at that point, which from a lower position looked like the summit, climb up and as usual, we see a new summit appearing in front of us. After a few disappointments we arrive on a flat spot with no option to go higher. We’re finally on top of Mount Hunter.

Early morning on top of the Butress, our last bivy

Early morning on top of the Butrress, our last bivy

Maxime traversing on the sharp ridge

Maxime traversing on the sharp ridge

Maxime on the ridge to Mt Hunters real summit, that rock in the back is our bivy

Maxime on the ridge to Mt. Hunters real summit, that rock in the back is our bivy

Is that the real summit?

Is that the real summit?

Fresh traces go down on the other side of the mountain in the direction of the west ridge, probably made by a skiing party that climbed and skied down the ramen route. As we always wanted to make a complete round-trip from our climb, this was the perfect descend or us. It was 10 in the morning, we know we need to descend the mountain as fast as possible but first we want to take enough time to rest. The summit is a huge platform so we easily take of our boots, dry our socks and unpack our bags in search of our reactor stove. As we’re sitting in the sun it is the first time since we left base camp that we manage to melt our water at a normal speed. We have to hydrate, get something to eat and of course enjoy the view. As I was in the range 4 years ago, back then we never managed to see the whole range as we always stayed on the southwest side of Denali and the day we topped out, it was in a whiteout. Now we can see 360° around us what surprised me how big this range is.

Around noon we start to descend the west ridge. First walking on the low angled summit slopes, then navigating through some seracs and finally traversing the exposed ridge in search of the fastest way down, the Ramen couloir. From high on the ridge we start rappelling into the couloir untill the angle kicks back and we continue climbing down. Our hope to reach base camp early in the evening gets knocked down the lower we got. The snow is too wet, too deep and too loose. Several times we trigger small slushes and sporadically stones rain down from higher on. We decide to take shelter underneath a boulder and wait untill the sun gets behind the ridge. We use the spare time to melt some extra water and eat the last freeze-dried food we kept on the side specially for this location, yes a crème brulé!

Summit!

Summit!

Sam navigating trough seracs on their west ridge descent

Sam navigating trough seracs on the West Ridge descent

Taking shelter in the Ramen couloir while everything is coming down

Taking shelter in the Ramen couloir while everything is coming down

Late in the evening the conditions are better and we continue the descend. We safely climb down to the glacier and descended further in the direction of the icefall. While we were scouting for descent options a few days ago we already saw the skyteam skinning up trough the icefall. As they found a way trough, we knew we could follow their way out. Walking on the right-hand side we find their tracks back and follow them in the direction of the icefall. This labyrinth is the last obstacle that separates us from the lower Kahiltna glacier and the easy walk to basecamp. We are somehow amazed by how good the snow holds our bodyweight but not for long. Once we reach the crevassed area, we suddenly fall knee-deep through a snow bridge. As we keep on following the tracks of the skiers, they clearly have a better support then us on our feet. We’re cross tens of scary snow bridges and look into deep crevasses. Eventually we end up crawling on our knees or even the belly while the one is securing the other. At the end of the icefall we make one last rappel from a huge snow formation, and we are more then happy to be at the safe zone of the lower glacier.

By this time we are almost 20 hours on the way, and still have a serious walk ahead. Compared to several different climbing partners in the past, I’m not technically not the strongest climber. But when it comes to long pushes on low energy, navigating nasty terrain, I really get into my zone. I give my last powerbar to Maxime and plug in my Ipod, which I specially saved for this occasion. Running low on energy while walking brainless on this massive glacier, nothing beats music to set the pace. Somehow it brings at a new level. You get rid of your tiredness and it seems like you just can walk forever.

The last kilometers around Mt Hunter back to Kahiltna Base Camp

The last kilometers around Mt Hunter back to Kahiltna Base Camp

It’s 3 in the morning and completely silent when we arrive back in the safety of our basecamp! We hug each other. Finally safe and sound from what was roughly a 90 hour round-trip. Without question this was the hardest climb we ever did! Something to eat, a short confirmation we’re down safe to Yannick and we get into our tent. The next day, we feel the wind pounding on our tent. Waiting for the sun to heat up our cosy space we soon discover it’s not going to happen. I open the zip of our tent with my swollen hands and see clouds rolling over from behind Foraker’s Sultana Ridge. We’re back at the right time, just before the next period of bad weather…

This expedition was possible thanks to:SupportAlaska

 

As far as we know, some other attempts and ascents were made this year:

 

Marianne van der Steen and Dennis Van Hoek climbed untill the first ice field but came back down when we the storm came in. A few days later they did an all-free ascent but due to bad weather they returned after the difficulties.

A party of 3 climbed the lower part of the Bibler Klewin, traverse into deprivation to avoid the Shaft and higher on, they got back to the bibler klewin. We don’t know if they only climbed the difficulties or they reached the top of the buttress or summit

Kyle Dempster did a solo attempt on the Bibler Klewin, returning after the first pitch in the shaft.

Max and Rustie like 2 other American parties climbed the lower pitches but no one of them got higher than The Prow

To get it all in scale...

To get it all in scale… The red line on Mt Hunter is the Bibler Klewin, our line of ascent. The 3 dots are our bivyspots. The purple dot is the end of the difficulties, the blue one is the top of the buttress, the green one is the summit of Hunter. The green line is our descent by the west ridge ramen route and the walk on the Kahiltna Glacier around the mountain

Topo

Paddle to the wall : Greenland kayak-climbing expedition !

Tags

, , , ,

Op een dag gingen 2 jonge belgische klimmertjes naar een kanoshop in Nederland….. Ze kochten 2 oplaasbare kayaks en reden terug naar België. In hun hoofd hadden ze een strak plan. Klimmen, kayakken,….euhhh Groenland?
tasermutWat is het plan? Deze zomer zullen Siebe Vanhee en ik (Tim De Dobbeleer) 2 maanden door de fjorden van Zuid-Groenland varen op zoek naar nieuwe onbeklommen wanden en lijnen. Neen, niet met een zeilboot maar met 2 kayaks volgestouwd met materiaal. De draagcapaciteit van de kayaks zou voldoende moeten zijn om onze 200kg materiaal boven water te houden, dat is ons toch verteld !

kayak

We zullen de hele tijd in volledige autonomie leven, en om onze ervaringen te delen zullen we regelmatig met onze sateliettelefoon updates geven over de stand van zaken op onze facebookpagina.

Veel dank ook aan onze sponsors want zonder hun is dit avontuur niet mogelijk.

Merci : Petzl, North Face, Millet, care plus, Trek n’eat, Klean Kanteen, K2, Avventura, Five Ten, Julbo, Brunton, Kbf, kayakshop Arjan Bloem en Bvkb

Let’s go !!!!

 

 

 

 

 

Le soleil a rendez vous avec la lune

Tags

, , , ,

Met een zere nek en tintelingen in de voorarmen dacht ik dat de bergen mij wel goed zouden doen. Zo vertrok ik 3 weken geleden naar Chamonix met Bruno Schoenmaekers. Een wisselende meteo deed ons afwijken van ons eerste objectief : De freney pijler. In de plaats daarvan kozen we voor envers des aiguilles,  nooit een slechte keuze….toch?

Ahhh.......Chamonix

Ahhh…….Chamonix

Etienne Journet, een sterke fransman uit Lille en een geroutineerd Freyr klimmer vergezelde ons. Het deed deugd om de longen wat zuurstof te geven in plaats van de vuile dieseldampen die ze elke dag tijdens mijn werk te verwerken krijgen. Zoals altijd voelde het weer geweldig om in de Envers hut toe te komen. Schoenen uit, kaas en worst boven halen en een koude panache voor Bruno zijn verjaardag. Zalig ! Omdat het nog maar 3 uur in de namiddag was vertrokken we nog voor Pasang, de retour de L’everest( Tour Verte)een 8 tal lengtes easy cruisen om terug wat aan het graniet gewend te geraken.
IMG_32632

Common Etienne, Crack it !!!

Common Etienne, Crack it !!!

6c, très chouette enfet

6c, très chouette enfet

Bruno the dulfer King !

Bruno the dulfer King !

De dag nadien staan we op tijd op voor le soleil a rendez vous avec la lune op de Grépon. Gelukkig had ik Bruno en Etienne kunnen overtuigen om niet in het holst van de nacht te vertrekken, maar enkele uurtjes later om 6 uur s’ochtends.  Zo kon ik nog enkele uurtjes rustig blijven liggen. Hoe meer slaap hoe beter me dunkt !

ah..... little rest before the storm

ah….. little rest before the storm

une fille?.... neen ! Etienne die zijn nagels gelakt heeft. Speciaal die fransmannen

une fille?…. neen ! Etienne die zijn nagels gelakt heeft. Speciaal die fransmannen

A fond la caisse les filles !

A fond la caisse les filles !

IMG_33162

Na 15 min op de gletsjer stappen van aan de hut staan we al aan de start van de route. Bij het aandoen van de schoenen merken we dat Etienne zijn nagels gelakt zijn. Bruno en ik kijken bedenkelijk naar elkaar “ Attention ! le petit janette français est la “  zeg ik nog.  Alez c’est parti les filles ! 25 lengtes doemen voor ons uit, maar de top die zien we niet, wolken met regen en sneeuw dat wel. Op zich baart ons dat weinig zorgen. We gaan ervoor en we zien wel waar we eindigen.  Over het algemeen is de route niet echt moeilijk, de behaking  goed en het routeverloop niet al te ingewikkeld. Naar het einde toe komt de wind wel opzetten, de regen wordt harder en de rots wordt langzaamaan natter en natter. De route krijgt nu wel ineens een extra uitdaging. Hevige sneeuwval zorgt voorverkleumde handen en pijnkreten maken het sufferfest compleet.  Etienne heeft blijkbaar minder last van de koude  dan Bruno en ik en klimt de 2 laatste 6B lengtes tot op de top van de Grépon. Bruno en ik trekken onze woorden van “le petit janette français” terug en volgen Etienne met veel afzien en gekreun.
IMG_33092IMG_33192

Om 17u s’avonds staan we op de top van de Grépon, de meeste mensen rapellen de route, maar wij hadden besloten om crampons en ijsbijl mee te pakken en zo de graat van de Grépon af te klimmen en richting Chamonix over de nantillons gletsjer af te dalen. Ons plan bleek met de huidige condities iets complexer dan aanvankelijk gedacht. Maar we hebben geluk, een uurtje later klaart het op. Eindelijk is duidelijk waar we ons exact bevinden.
IMG_33272

Zalig om hier te zijn te midden van al die scherpe pieken bedekt met een dun laagje sneeuw. De sneeuw maakt het afdalen van de graad eigenlijk een pak gemakkelijker en op de nantillons gletsjer lijken al de losse stenen vastgevroren. Op warme zomerdagen sta je hier voor een vuurpeleton van losse stenen. Een te mijden plek dus. Maar met de huidige condities, perfect ! Daarna lopen euhhh….sprinten we nog even onder de seracs van de gletsjer door.  Zonder al te veel na te denken en royaal veel rustpauzes belandden we terug aan het montenvers station. Ieder van ons is stikkapot en uiteindelijk is het 3 uur s’nachts als we beneden in Chamonix een vergebakken stukje Kiche naar binnen werken.

Nu tijd voor een nieuw objectief. Iets met big walls, kayaks, ijsbergen,…. Groenland!!! Straks meer daarover.

Sinds kort heb ik ook enkele sponsors die me steunen bij volgende klimtrips.

Heel veel dank aan : K2, Petzl, Millet en Julbo !
naamloos

Warming-up for summer.

Tags

, , , , ,

Ondanks de vriendelijke Italiaanse bouwvakker die ons had verwelkomd, wist de aannemer ons toch te verzekeren dat een tweede nacht in het winter bivak er niet in zat. Voor de werkzaamheden in de Albert I hut verbleef een team arbeiders in de oude houten hut en was deze niet toegankelijk voor het alpiene publiek. Een geluk dat de vriendelijke Italiaan ons toegang verleende gezien die nacht de hemelgoden behoorlijk van zich lieten horen.

Brain-workout

Slecht weer uitzitten in het winter bivak

 

Gezien we uit voorzorg een tent meegenomen hadden, vertrokken Denis en ik de volgende ochtend gepakt en gezakt richting de Grand Fourche. We hadden onze zinnen op het Gabarou-couloir (NO-couloir) te gezet.

Nog geen anderhalf uur na ons vertrek zakt de voorspelde bewolking en bevinden we ons plots in een complete white-out – boven onder, links of rechts, alles wit – waardoor we na een uur wachten besluiten de tent op te zetten en te wachten tot de mist optrekt.

White-out... Tentje opzetten dan maar?

White-out… Tentje opzetten dan maar?

Om 14u30 was het ondanks de blauwe hemel te laat voor grotere plannen maar om toch nog iéts op het palmares te zetten lopen we snel even de west graat van de tête blanche op en af. Niet echt noemenswaardig maar bon. Erna gaan we door tot de voet van de Chardonnet, waar we de tent opzetten en een heerlijk lange nachtrust tegemoet gaan.

Magisch effectje op de Chardonnet

Magisch effectje op de Chardonnet

Om 6u de volgende ochtend vertrekken we de gletsjer omhoog richting de basis van “goulotte Escara”. De 30 centimeter sneeuw die de voorbije nacht gevallen was, zorgt ervoor dat we moeizaam vorderen en pas om 7u45 aan de start van de route staan.

30cm verse sneeuw omhoog ploeteren...

Dertig centimeter verse sneeuw omhoog ploeteren…

Zes lange, maar mooie lengtes – we klimmen af en toe simultaan – met een korte crux loodrecht ijs brengen ons tot op een kleine col van waaruit we enkele Britten de laatste meters zien afleggen van de Migot-pijler. Een laatste inspanning door wat ploetersneeuw brengt ons tot de top van de Chardonnet.

Fun climbing in Escarra (foto: Denis Hoste)

Fun climbing in Escarra (foto: Denis Hoste)

Gezien een Franse cordee ons voor was via de Migot vinden we de rappels makkelijk en staan we enkele uren later terug aan de tent. Een lastige lange afdaling met veel honger (we hadden veel te weinig koeken mee naar boven) brengt ons tot in de Poco-Loco, alwaar we de nodige calorieën terug aanvullen!

Britten hoog op de Migot-pijler

Britten hoog op de Migot-pijler

Summit!

Summit!

Na wat rust neem ik met Stijn Dekeyser nog een dagje ‘den bak’ naar boven. Gezien mijn blauwe teennagel nog pijn doet besluiten we geen erg lange route meer in te kruipen en klimmen we “Le temps est assassin”, een mixte route die er op dit moment erg droog bij ligt.

Ik wil klimschoenen... Geen crampons (foto: Stijn Dekeyser)

Ik wil klimschoenen… Geen crampons (foto: Stijn Dekeyser)

Wat funky klimmen en creatieve bijl en crampon-plaatsingen – wat is het geluid en de geur van metaal op rots toch heerlijk – komen we na 3 lengtes tot een punt waar we het de moeite niet meer vinden om verder te klimmen (dal + crampons = not fun). Enkele rappels door het couloir Perroux brengen ons terug richting een oververhitte Valée Blanche.

Fijne ijslijn in de tweede lengte van 'Le temps est assassin'

Fijne ijslijn in de tweede lengte van ‘Le temps est assassin’

Geëxposeerd om het hoekje klimmen

Geëxposeerd om het hoekje klimmen (foto: Stijn Dekeyser)

Een tof weekje als opwarmer voor een veelbelovende zomer!

MC’s in groenland, Canada, en nog verdere avonturen in Chamonix en Alpen afgewisseld met nu en dan een flashback naar Alaska zullen voor een boeiende zomer-episode op de blog zorgen!

Even uitpuffen na de afdaling

Even uitpuffen na de afdaling (foto: Denis Hoste)


Tekst en foto’s (tenzij anders vermeld): Nelson Neirinck

Met dank aan onze sponsors:

SupportAlaska

 

Alaska 2014 Part 1: Southwestfork acclimatization climbs

Tags

, , , , , , , , ,

 

140429_ALAS_IMG_0085_LoRes

We’re back in Belgium for more then a month now. after a fast update when we just flew out of the Range there was a long silence. I tried to write down the story of our climb and work myself trough the pictures. But soon ended up in hectic job, which gives me almost no spare time for picture editing. Anyway here is the first part of our trip to the Central Alaska Range.

26th of April, we arrived in Alaska. After a shopping day in Anchorage we drove up north, to Talkeetna. Checked in at the Ranger Station and made everything ready to fly into the Mountains. Weather seemed good but still tired from the last days before departure, we could use another rest day.

Ready for lift off

Ready for lift off

29th of April we we’re ready to fly to the Kahiltna Airstrip. Together with 2 other teams we’re dropped of on the glacier. A first look up to our main objective, Mt Hunters North Buttress, and a small talk with TAT pilot, Paul Roderick gave us some doubts. The ice was thinner then other years and this year nobody tried it yet. There even was no other team planning an attempt. As we set up our basecamp, the 2 other teams left and heading in the direction of Denali. There we’re some deserted tents, basecamp was not installed yet so when Paul lifted of it was a nice feeling, alone there!

Checking conditions on the face. A Goal Zero Nomad 20 with a Sherpa 100 to keep everything up and running

Checking conditions on the Buttress from Base Camp. The upper south face of Denali in the back and a Goal Zero Nomad 20 with a Sherpa 100 to keep everything up and running

A last short snow shower and the weather forecast gave us 4 days of perfect weather. We did a trip up into the southeast fork scouting for route conditions and our thoughts about thin and dry conditions were confirmed.

Maxime hiking into the Southwestfork of Kahiltna Glacier

Maxime hiking into the Southeast fork of Kahiltna Glacier

On the 1st of May we left basecamp late morning and started the 2-hour hike to Mini Moonflower. Mini Moonflower is a small summit on the ridge between Mt Hunter and Kahiltna Queen. We were hoping to climb its 600 meters North Couloir but were still wondering how to pass the crux without ice. We crossed the shrund easily and started climbing the lower couloir. There was hard blue ice but we managed to find some neve runnels, which made the climbing faster. As the couloir turned into a small gully the route steepened, Maxime led another pitch and made belay beneath the crux pitch.

 

Sam crossing the shrund. Mini moonflower north couloir is the

Sam crossing the shrund. Mini Moonflower north couloir is the gully in the center

Maxime in the lower couloir of Mini Moonflower

Maxime in the lower couloir of Mini Moonflower

According to the supertopo guidebook this crux supposed to be a thin layer of 85° ice but now there was a dry section of 10 meters. I started climbing, first straight up till the part where the ice disappeared. Then following the corner system a few meters on the left. Although there were some cracks with good axe placements, it was difficult to place my crampons. With the help of some aid techniques to rest and scout the next steps I got slowly higher. Almost on the end of the pitch but there is a small overhanging rock formation avoiding us to climb straight up. I made a traverse to the right, back to the original route where I could find some small patches of ice. A bit higher up I made belay and brought Maxime up. Maxime freed the pitch thinking it would be something M6/M7.

Sam in search of ice on the crux of Mini Moonflower

Sam in search of ice on the crux of Mini Moonflower

Maxime exiting the crux pitch of Mini Moonflower

Maxime exiting the crux pitch of Mini Moonflower North Couloir

We climbed 2 other steep pitches and the gully kicked back to a 60° snow ramp leading to the summit ridge. It was already late afternoon when we reached ridge. Motivation was pretty low and didn’t fancy the last 100 meters in loose snow to the summit so we started rappelling down.

Sam leading the last steep pitch on the Mini Moonflower

Sam leading the last steep pitch on the Mini Moonflower

Maxime topping out on the Ridge of Mini Moonflower

Maxime topping out on the Ridge of Mini Moonflower

 

Our confidence grew after this climb. The ice was less hard then we expected and our clothing system seemed to suit the job. We took a rest day, organising our base camp and slowly some other teams we’re flying in. Some just started their expedition others came over from another Glacier. One team, who was dropped of for only 3 days, immeadiatly attempted the Moonflower Buttress but lost too much time on the shrund, and didn’t climbed higher then the Prow.

We haven’t been on altitude for a while. We wanted to make a good shot to go all the way on mount Hunter so we decided to do an extra acclimatisation climb. Early morning on the 3th of May we left the airstrip planning to climb Kahiltna Queen by its 1000 meter west face couloir.

Sam approaching Kahiltna Queen, The west face couloir is the obvious snow line starting in the middle of the face and leading up to the righthand ridge

Sam approaching Kahiltna Queen, The west face couloir is the obvious snow line starting in the middle of the face and leading up to the righthand ridge

This route is dangerous for stonefall when sun hits the face. That’s why we thought to leave really early, hoping to top out before noon and staying on the 12.000ft summit till it’s safe again to descend. Kahiltna Queen is the beautifull pyramid at the end of the Southwestfork valley. 3 hours of skinning brought us to the base of the route. We roped up and simulclimbed the lower angled snowcouloir. Our timing was close but as soon we left the big couloir sun started to hit the upper part and stones started falling down. We were out of the big couloir and climbed to the top ridge. The climbing was never hard and after 5 hours we reached the first summit and traversed to the real summit. 10 meters underneath the summit we returned cause the cornice was too big and scary!

Maxime low on Kahiltna Queen's West Face Couloir, Mt Hunter on the right

Maxime low on Kahiltna Queen’s West Face Couloir, Mt Hunter on the right

Sam approaching the summit ridge

Sam approaching the summit ridge

Maxime in a steeper step of the Kahiltna Queen

Maxime in a steeper step of the Kahiltna Queen

Sam climbing the last meters to the summit

Sam climbing the last meters to the summit

As hoped we found a good bivy on a small platform in between the two summits. A fantastic view around us and for the first time we could see a less steeper version of Mt Hunter’s north Buttress Although the forecast said it will be good weather for another day. Clouds where coming in from behind Foraker. Hoping it will clear, we got into our sleeping bags and waited. Around midnight clouds were coming close and it started snowing slightly. Time to pack our bags and start the descend. Early morning we where back at the Kahiltna Base Camp. Weather forecast showed us some days of bad weather. This was the perfect reason to take a rest and focus us on our big objective, Mt Hunter!

Bivy with the summit corniche of Kahiltna Queen in the background

Bivy with the summit corniche of Kahiltna Queen in the background

The big 3 seen from the summit of Kahiltna QueenThe big 3 seen from the summit of Kahiltna Queen

Maxime descending trough the night

Maxime descending in worsening weather conditions

Our expedition was possible with the support from:

SupportAlaska

Go Big in Alaska! Mt Hunter, Moonflower Buttress.

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

We will write more next weeks but you can find a small English text at the end of this post!

From left to right: Kahiltna Queen West Face (1000m, IV 60° ), Mini Moonflower North Couloir (600m, IV 85° ), Mt Hunter Bibler-Klewin (1800m, VI )

From left to right: Kahiltna Queen West Face (1000m, IV 60° ), Mini Moonflower North Couloir (600m, IV 85° ), Mt Hunter Bibler-Klewin (1800m, VI 5.8 WI6 M6 A2)

Het is even stil geweest na het nieuws dat we (Maxime en Sam) aan de beklimming van Mount Hunter waren begonnen. Onze excuses daarvoor, zij die onze Mount Coach facebook pagina volgen wisten ondertussen de afloop van ons verhaal. Een uitgebreide versie volgt, maar nu we terug in de bewoonde wereld zijn laten we jullie maar al te graag mee genieten van onze 4 weken op de Kahiltna Gletsjer, Alaska.

Our plane and yes, thats our gear and food for a month

Talkeetna Air Taxi, and yes, thats our gear and food for a month

Eind April vlogen we met Talkeetna Air Taxi naar Kahiltna Base Camp. Het doel van onze expeditie was een beklimming van Mt Hunter North Buttress, de Moonflower genaamd, en dit via de Bibler Klewin. Een enorm moeilijke ijs en rots route. Yannick had 2 weken geleden al een vlezige quote uit supertopo overgenomen die het karakter van de route een beetje schetst.

Our base camp on the Southeast Fork

Our base camp on the Southeast Fork

We worden op de gletsjer afgezet en krijgen direct 4 dagen goed weer voorgeschoteld. We verkennen de vallei en de mogelijkheden. We beklimmen een satelliettop van Mt Hunter, de Mini Moonflower, via het “North Couloir”. Zo kunnen we wennen aan het ijs en zien we of onze kleren en materiaal voldoet aan de condities in Alaska. We nemen een rustdag en beklimmen het West Face Couloir van Kahiltna Queen. Om te wennen aan de hoogte slapen we iets onder de top tot we in een naderende storm sneller moeten terugkeren.

Sam in search of ice on the crux of Mini Moonflower

Sam in search of ice on the crux of Mini Moonflower

Maxime topping out on the Ridge of Mini Moonflower

Maxime topping out on the Ridge of Mini Moonflower

Maxime

Maxime in a steeper step of the Kahiltna Queen

Bivy on top of Kahiltna Queen

Bivy on top of Kahiltna Queen

Enkele dagen verse sneeuw vallen perfect samen met onze geplande rustdagen tot een 4 daags hoge druk gebied nadert. Dit wordt onze kans. Vrijdag 9 Mei, omstreeks 11 u ‘s middags kruipen we in de wand. Wat volgen zijn lange dagen technisch en moeilijk klimmen. the Twin runnels, Leaning Ramp, the Prow, McNerthney Ice Dagger , Tamaras Traverse, the Shaft, the Vision, ijsvelden en de Bibler Come Again Exit… In totaal een 1800 meter klimmen. 80°, 90° tot overhangend ijs en sneeuw-champignons, M5 tot M7 als je het vrij klimt of artificieel tot A2. Een vluchtige blik in de topo en al snel begrijp je waarom deze route als een van de moeilijkere in Noord Amerika wordt beschouwd.

140509_ALAS_IMG_0679-Edit

Maxime exiting the McNerthney Ice Dagger, Tamara’s Traverse is up next

140510_ALAS_IMG_2942

Maxime making the pendule out of the prow © Zach Clanton Photography

Bivy at the first icefield

Bivy at the first ice field, Mt Foraker in the back

140510_ALAS_IMG_1656

Sam leading a pitch in the Shaft

We klimmen tot ‘s avonds laat, eten en drinken pas als de zon onder is en gaan na nachten van amper 4 uur slaap terug verder. De derde avond, Zondag 11 Mei bereiken we de top van de Buttress, veel teams keren hier terug maar om onze beklimming compleet te maken gaan we door tot de echte top van Hunter. Maandagmiddag nemen we een korte pauze op de top waarna we de berg afdalen via de “Ramenroute” en zo onze beklimming tot een gehele rondtrip vervolmaken.

140512_ALAS_IMG_0972

Sam and Maxime on the summit of Mt Hunter

140513_ALAS_IMG_1034

Climbing down the west ridge, the Ramen and walking back to Base Camp

We rusten een 5 tal dagen uit, Maxime lost een probleem met tandpijn op en we besluiten een nieuw doel op te zoeken. 4 jaar geleden bracht ik (Sam ) met Joris Van Reeth een eerste bezoek aan de “Central Alaska Range”. Ons doel was de Cassin graat op noord Amerika’s hoogste berg, Denali/McKinley. Wat een groots succes moest worden draaide uit op één van de donkerste periodes uit mijn leven. Joris verongelukte in het Japanse Couloir. Ik werd gered uit mijn hachelijke positie maar het lichaam van Joris bleef achter. Een lange periode van veel sneeuw zorgde ervoor dat Joris nooit gevonden werd en dus nu nog steeds onderaan Denali’s zuidwand of in de Northeast Fork rust.

A snowy day at Kahiltna Basecamp

A snowy day at Kahiltna Basecamp

Verscheidene zoektochten kort na het ongeval waren zonder succes. Dus zoeken nu, 4 jaar na datum was niet ons doel. Na onze beklimming van de Moonflower zochten we een mooi 2de objectief, en de Cassin leek ons daar best voor geschikt. Een prachtige uitdagende lijn, een mooi eerbetoon aan Joris en de mogelijkheid om terug te komen op een intense plaats. Met slechts 12 dagen resterend wisten we dat we in een uiterst krap tijdschema zaten. We moesten nog verder acclimatiseren en dat zou toch snel een week duren. Dan even uitrusten en het perfecte weer moest zich dus juist in de laatste dagen van onze trip. De kans was uiterst klein maar zeker het proberen waart. Helaas, aangekomen op 14.000ft werd al snel duidelijk dat het gewenst weer zich niet ging tonen. We probeerden nog een poging op de eenvoudigere West Rib maar door koude vingers en tenen zijn we een 600 meter onder de top terug gekeerd. Uiteindelijk zijn we 4 dagen vroeger dan verwacht terug in Talkeetna. Er naderde een forse storm en die zaten we niet graag in een tent uit…

Leaving the Southeast Fork and we're on our way to 14.000ft

Leaving the Southeast Fork and we’re on our way to 14.000ft, Mt Hunter’s North Buttress and the long West ridge in the background

Bad weather is coming in

Bad weather is coming in

Sitting out a snowstorm

Sitting out a snowstorm

Acclimatising on the West Rib

Acclimatising on the West Rib

Maxime resting out at 17000ft on Denali's West Rib. Mt Hunter and Foraker in the back

Maxime resting out at 17000ft on Denali’s West Rib. Mt Hunter and Foraker in the back

Ondanks dat de laatste week minder vlot verliep dan gewenst kunnen we deze expeditie toch een succes noemen. Ons hoofddoel, Mount Hunter’s North Buttress is immers beklommen, en dit tot de echte top! Met enige fierheid kunnen we zeggen dat er slechts een 15 tal teams ons dit ooit heeft voorgedaan. En dat lijstje bestaat uit best grote namen….

Maxime De Groote and Sam Van Brempt

Maxime De Groote and Sam Van Brempt

This expedition was possible with the support from:

SupportAlaska

 —————————————

We just flew out of the range. We’ll write some bigger reports the upcoming weeks, but for now a short write up and some pictures about our 4 weeks long trip in the Central Alaska Range. We flew in end of April, a high-pressure system served us with 4 days of perfect weather. We hiked into the Southeast Fork checking out the Bibler-Klewin on the North Buttress of Hunter and the Mini Moonflower. The Bibler-Klewin looked thin but doable but we decided to start easy. Next day we climbed Mini Moonflower by it’s North Couloir, we took another rest day and climbed Kahiltna Queen by its West Face Couloir. To get in better shape for altitude we tried to sleep on the summit. But bad weather came in earlier so we needed to descend at night.

Some days of clouds and fresh snow later we got the next high-pressure system coming in. Again they predicted 4 days of perfect blue sky. On Friday 9th of May, around noon we crossed the schrund and started climbing. Because of the difficulty, the fresh snow we needed to clean, and the thin or dry sections we weren’t a fast party. We chopped a bivy at the first and second ice field and a slept a third night on top of the buttress. Always climbing till sun sets, then starting to melt snow and get something to eat before we took a short sleep and started moving again. On Monday around noon we topped out on Mount Hunter itself, descending by it’s west ridge and the Ramen Route.

We had roughly 12 days left, everything was melting around the airstrip so we decided to get higher up. Cassin Ridge on Denali was our next goal. We knew we were short in time but if it all turned perfect it could work. We skied up to 14.000ft but bad weather was slowing us down. From here on, the weather forecast wasn’t looking good either. Eventually we climbed up the West Rib, slept one night at 17.000ft and tried to get higher the next day but wind was blowing hard and we couldn’t keep our hands and feet warm. Descending back to 14.000ft we knew we were capable of getting on the Cassin but with a storm coming in and our waiting time that was over we decided to get back down and fly out.

Despite our last week, which wasn’t working out fine, we can speak about a successful expedition. We succeeded on our main goal, climbing Mount Hunter’s Moonflower Buttress to the summit, without question the hardest thing we ever did!

Volg

Ontvang elk nieuw bericht direct in je inbox.

Doe mee met 899 andere volgers